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Wednesday, June 15, 2011

On Loan for a Certain Time

On Loan for a predetermined time: image courtesy photobucket

The family gathered around the hospital bed of my Dad. His yellow complexion told us that his kidneys were in bad shape. He had been sick for a long while and we knew it.

He gazed at us with eyes that did not compute any awareness that this was his family hovered around him.

The Doctor informed us that they were going to move Dad to another hospital 35 miles away, where they could treat him better.

Already they had placed an IV into his wrist and were also giving him medicine through the tubes.

A few days later at the other hospital they took Dad into surgery and installed a stint into his body to receive the dialysis treatments that were being prescribed.

Back into his assigned room, he was given an oxygen nasal cannula that was placed on his face to give him better breathing ability. The room was cool, but the sweat rolled off his forehead.

By this time, he was able to recognize his family, but to tell the truth, Dad did not look very happy. A tube was down his throat, and he was not able to tell us that he loved us, but it was there written in his eyes. His eyes also told us that he was afraid and extremely miserable to be there in this hospital. We knew he wanted to go home.

Every day my mother traveled that 70 mile round trip to be with him. Dad seemed to be in pain and he was extremely uncomfortable. Most days he did not recognize mother.

The Doctors were doing their best to keep him alive, but they could not predict a cure. Like a clock ticking, the days marked off until after a set time, his insurance ran out !!

Taking mother out into the hall, the Doctor suggested that there was one more surgery they could do, or she could take him home and somehow transport him back every few days for more dialysis. 

Mother told the Doctor, "No more surgery, he has suffered enough."

The Doctor then asked mother to wait here out in the hall while he stepped back into Dad’s room. Returning he told Mom, “He is gone, you may go in and say good bye.”

God had loaned Dad to our mother for these many years, yet in her heart she knew that it was time to let him return to his maker.

A few days later we all gathered as family and friends to say our fare well, but see you later!

In life each one of us have parents, siblings, family and even pets, who have been LOANED to us for a predetermined time. Although we are not happy about having to say good bye, there comes a time when we must allow them to leave us.

Understanding the lending process is to also be made aware that the person or even our pet must at some point in time be returned to the rightful owner. We weep tears, and usually they are selfish tears because we do not desire to make that release.

The truth is God will wipe away those tears and he will give us his comfort and his peace if we ask.

5 comments:

  1. Hazel, this makes me happy and sad all at once. I love the thought of "see you later" instead of "goodbye". That's what it is, isn't it? A very loving tribute. Bless you and your family in the loss of your dad.

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  2. What a great outlook or perspective. And while I completely agree with it, I have to admit that I'm one of the selfish ones. I lost my dad a year ago last month and while my heart rejoices for where he is, my heart also longs for his presence here. Like a wrote somewhere earlier today, sometimes happy endings aren't happy.
    Good one, thanks.

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  3. you're right.
    it is hard to let go.

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  4. What strength your mother had, to refuse the surgery.

    Such a beautiful love story.

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  5. "On loan"... How often I, we, forget that, but it is a "see you again" for those who belong to Christ. Thank you for sharing this story and for the perspective of "on loan". Blessings.

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